Forum Activity for @employment-network

Employment Network
@employment-network
12/13/17 12:36:25PM
17 posts

Great Lakes ADA Center


Resources

The Great Lakes ADA Center works to increase awareness and knowledge with the ultimate goal of achieving voluntary compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. They are also great resources on accessible technology. 

Great Lakes ADA Center provides training, expert assistance, and information about the ADA. They are not an enforcement or regulatory agency. Their mission is "make it possible for everyone with a disability to live a life of freedom and equality."

 Take a look at their site to learn more about the information, resources, and services they offer. 

Employment Network
@employment-network
12/13/17 12:10:10PM
17 posts

Changing graduation requirements for students with disabilities?


Hot Topics and Challenges for Employment

The New York State Board of Regents has adopted new regulations that will allow high school students with disabilities to earn a local diploma without passing any of the state's Regents exams.

Is this good news or bad news? What do you think? Should Wisconsin be looking at our graduation requirements for students with disabilities? What's been your experience with graduation requirements? 

Read the rest of the article about New York here


updated by @employment-network: 12/13/17 12:10:23PM
Employment Network
@employment-network
11/07/17 01:57:43PM
17 posts

What useful employment resources would you recommend?


Resources

There are many resources related to employment and disabilities. Each month, we'll have a "Featured Resource". We're starting this month with the Job Accommodation Network (JAN).

What resource is your "go-to" resource? Why do you value it? Where can we find it?


updated by @employment-network: 11/07/17 01:57:56PM
Employment Network
@employment-network
11/07/17 01:53:58PM
17 posts

Job Accommodation Network (JAN)


Resources

Have you heard of the Job Accommodation Network (JAN)? According to their website:

The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) is the leading source of free, expert, and confidential guidance on workplace accommodations and disability employment issues. Working toward practical solutions that benefit both employer and employee, JAN helps people with disabilities enhance their employability, and shows employers how to capitalize on the value and talent that people with disabilities add to the workplace.

JAN’s trusted consultants offer one-on-one guidance on workplace accommodations, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and related legislation, and self-employment and entrepreneurship options for people with disabilities. Assistance is available both over the phone and online. Those who can benefit from JAN’s services include private employers of all sizes, government agencies, employee representatives, and service providers, as well as people with disabilities and their families.

JAN is one of the best resources to have bookmarked on your computer, with their phone number on speed dial. Check out their website for great resources and call or email them with specific questions about job accommodations. An excellent resource.

Have you used JAN or recommended it to anyone else? What's your experience with JAN?


updated by @employment-network: 11/07/17 01:55:17PM
Employment Network
@employment-network
01/20/17 09:59:43AM
17 posts

What Questions do you have about the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act?


Hot Topics and Challenges for Employment

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) is new federal policy that is shaping transition and employment services for individuals with disabilities around the country, including Wisconsin.  InControl Wisconsin recently held a webinar to share information about this law and how it affects you or the people you work with.  You can find the recording of the webinar as well as links to lots of resources that were mentioned during the webinar here.

How will this policy effect you or the people you work will?  What questions do you have about it?

Employment Network
@employment-network
09/21/16 08:18:58AM
17 posts

What Are Your Hot Topics or Challenges?


Hot Topics and Challenges for Employment

We know that there are a lot of you out there in the communities working to increase opportunities for people with disabilities to earn livable wages, pursue meaningful careers, and have real choices about individualized employment.    

We want to hear from you! What's your hot topic for employment these days?  Tell us what topics affect your everyday life.  What questions do you have about employment?


updated by @employment-network: 09/21/16 08:23:35AM
Employment Network
@employment-network
12/02/15 10:53:51AM
17 posts

Comments and Questions About The New "Home" For The Employment Network


Welcome and Announcements

As with any big transition, there is a lot to learn and explore.  We understand there will be bumps and detours along the way, but we’re here to help!  We want to hear from you!  

Do you like it?  Are you confused about something? Do you have a suggestion? We want feedback from our members, so we can work to improve it for everyone.

Please leave your questions, comments, and ideas here.  


updated by @employment-network: 03/01/16 05:33:48PM
Employment Network
@employment-network
09/08/14 01:41:36PM
17 posts

HEC change and new fax number


Benefits and Work Incentives

Thanks for posting.. For future reference, this should really be posted under news rather than under discussion. Thanks!

Employment Network
@employment-network
09/03/14 12:40:07PM
17 posts

9/3 Coffee Break: Transition and Employment for Youth


Coffee Breaks

We had a great discussion this morning with special guest Nancy Molfenter about employment and transition for youth. We talked mainly about how we need to get schools to better involve providers in transition planning. Here are some main points we discussed:

  • Schools often have just a little bit of information about ADRCs and other aspects of the adult service system. Ideally, schools should have transition nights or fairs for students and families to increase collaboration and communication. These should involve: ADRCs, IRIS, MCO, DVR, WIBC, other adult service providers, as well as students and parents of students who have graduated and are working in the community to share their stories.
  • Schools tend to send out very generic transition information. It seems that much of it is geared toward youth with developmental/cognitive disabilities.
  • Benefit counseling is initiated by a person with a disability. Unfortunately, many times, families report that the benefits determination made them feel that employment was not an option for their child. This is why transition events are crucial for families.

We want to thank Nancy for her time today. I'm sure there was much more info that other people on the chat learned. Does anyone want to share anything?


updated by @employment-network: 11/20/15 08:31:41PM
Employment Network
@employment-network
08/04/14 01:38:58PM
17 posts

Blog: "How to Find a Job if you Have a Disability"--- What are your thoughts?


Open Discussions

I came across this blog entry about how to find a job if you have a disability onhttp://www.abilityculture.comand it caught my eye. I think it has some valid points, but I also think it has some controversialsuggestions. What are your thoughts? Do you agree with these? What other suggestions would you have?

How to Find a Job if you Have a Disability

August 3, 2014by

Fact: there are 26.5 million workers (and wannabe applicants,) aged 16 above, who suffer from a disability. Given the tough job market today, the struggle for these individuals is deemed to be 100% harder.
Although job searching is no walk in the park for disabled persons (no pun intended,) they can earn employment just like any other applicant. Here are some tips that can help you, a disabled family member or a friend get that job.

Prime the Employer
Although theAmericans with Disabilities Actprotects said persons from discrimination, some individuals often end up stunning the employers with their handicaps. To prevent the surprise that can shift the mood of the assessor, experts advise disabled individuals to inform the employer about their handicaps prior to the interview. This will help eliminate the shock factor on the part of the employer, which can change the tone of the interview.
While this can help one get a job, experts warn applicants not to divulge too much about his handicap. As such, avoid talking excessively about your handicap or its health complications or why it has led to your absenteeism or resignation from your previous job. More often than not, these can be detrimental to the possible hiring of the disabled employee.

Come to the Interview Prepared
The importance of being prepared cannot be overstated, especially in disabled applicants. For example, if you need a sign language interpreter, it is best if you inform the HR personnel ahead of time.
For invisible or perceived disabilities such as diabetes, inform the interviewer about the peculiar things that might happen. For example, tell him your need to urinate often polyuria which is a symptom of diabetes.

Be Confident
Disabled or not, the key to gaining employment is to act, sound and look confident during the interview. Just because you are handicapped, it does not mean that you are less qualified than the other applicants. In fact, this shortcoming should push you to perform better. For example, when interviewing for ajob at a shopping malldont be concerned about any limitations. Show them that you know that you can sell to customers and that you know your way around the mall.

Be an Apprentice
Experience is vital for most employers. To gain footing in the job hunting world, work as an apprentice in a field you are interested in. Not only will you obtain much needed job experience, it can provide you with a minimum hourly wage as well.

Seek the Help of a Disability Employment Specialist
While there are employers who openly accept disabled applicants, there are some who feel that handicapped workers cannot perform duties as well as healthy employees. If you encounter these employers often, then it is time that you sought the help of a Disability Employment Specialist. In the United States, these individuals are called Selective Placement Program Coordinators. They can match you with jobs, including those offered by the Federal Government. In the United Kingdom, these specialists are known as Disability Employment Advisers. They can help you find a job, and provide training as needed. They even provide financial assistance so you can purchase the equipment or commute to your new place of work.

With that being said, no matter where you live, there are people can help you get a job despite your limitations. Your disabilities physical or perceived should not stop you from getting the job you deserve. By following these tips, you can gain employment that can satisfy you mentally, socially and financially.

Source: http://www.abilityculture.com/how-to-find-a-job-if-you-have-a-disability/


updated by @employment-network: 11/21/15 10:04:15AM
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