Forum Activity for @employment-network

Employment Network
@employment-network
06/23/14 09:07:41PM
17 posts

DIGITAL JOURNAL: Americans Overwhelmingly Support Employment for People with Disabilities


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An interesting article in the Digital Journal about how a recent poll shows that 96% of working Americans support the right of people with disabilities to be actively employed. I also find it interesting that the poll shows that 91% ofAmericans believe qualified people with disabilities should be hired for the same positions as those without disabilities. If this is true, why does the national employment rate for people with disabilities still so low?

Americans Overwhelmingly Support Employment for People with Disabilities

While only 26 percent of employed Americans believe they work alongside people with disabilities, a new Harris Poll commissioned bySourceAmericashows that 96 percent of working Americans support the right of people with disabilities to be actively employed.

SourceAmerica, a national nonprofit that creates employment opportunities for people with significant disabilities through its network of over 1,000 community-based agencies, conducted the online survey of more than 2,000 U.S. adults, 18 and older earlier this month to assess current attitudes toward Americans with disabilities in the workplace.

The findings enhance ongoing nationwide efforts to create jobs for people with significant disabilities. Over 50 self-advocates will make hundreds of visits on Capitol Hill this week during SourceAmerica's annual Grassroots Advocacy Conference to ensure Americans with disabilities have more access to employment opportunities. Currently, more than 80 percent of people with disabilities do not have jobs.

The poll results also suggest that 91 percent of employed Americans believe qualified people with disabilities should be hired for the same positions as those without disabilities. An equally large percentage, 92 percent, believes that it is important for our workplaces to embrace a diverse workforce, including individuals with disabilities.

In addition, the results confirm a 2013 SourceAmerica survey that shows nine out of 10 customers are satisfied that the quality of work from a person with disability is as high as those without, and demonstrates SourceAmerica's commitment to creating job opportunities for people with significant disabilities.

Source:http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1990156#ixzz35WFMqpaa


updated by @employment-network: 11/21/15 06:48:49PM
Employment Network
@employment-network
06/16/14 08:52:10AM
17 posts

Article/Blog: The Seasons of Life With a Disability


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An interesting blog post byPaula Reuben Vieillet, President and Founder,Employment Options, Inc.about the seasons of disability employment. It's interesting to think about it in seasons. What are your thoughts on this? Do you agree with her?

The Seasons of Life With a Disability

By Paula Reuben Vieillet

There are many seasons of life, and for those receiving Social Security disability benefits, these seasons can be seen through the lenses of working and not working.

Working means so much more than just a paycheck. It is how a day is structured, how a week is scheduled, how months and vacations are planned. It is a place to go and something to do that contributes to a company and society.

The season of not working is about healing. It is about acceptance of a disability and the time and space to sort out this newly configured life.It is a time of learning about ones abilities and recognizing that each person is so much more than his or her job. It is about finding inner strength to overcome obstacles and move toward better health and stability.

Unlike the four seasons of nature, of which no one has any control, a person who is receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or non-retirement Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits has the potential to change their own career seasons.

TheTicket to Work programis a free federally-sponsored program designed to help beneficiaries receiving SSDI or SSI attempt to work again.

Take Anna from Virginia life threw Anna into a blizzard of depression and social anxiety issues, which caused her to have difficulty working around other people and forced her to quit looking for employment in her community.

As her health deteriorated, Anna was very grateful to have her Social Security disability benefits. She took the time she needed to heal and worked hard each day to get stronger.

When Anna felt healthier, she wanted to try to work again, but didnt know where to begin. She researched the Ticket to Work program online and found out that she could try to return to work without fear of losing her benefits and health insurance immediately. The Social Security Administration would even give her free job counseling by assigning her personal ticket to work to anEmployment Network (EN).

ENs help beneficiaries find suitable work. While each one has different specialties, all of them are listed on theTicket to Work website. There are both state-based and national ENs. Anna chose Employment Options because of its specialty in national work-at-home positions. She had previous experience in medical coding and billing, and with her health, it was better suited for her to work from her home.

Anna was assigned to Sarah Lind, an Employment Options job counselor, who worked with her one-on-one to assess her skills, target suitable jobs, prepare a resume and practice interviewing. She is now working as an outpatient coder from her home and is thriving! She overcame the blizzard and entered the season of springing into a new beginning.

Anna was thrilled and could feel her self-esteem rising again. She changed the seasons of her life by creating a new vision of herself that included making the best of her abilities, rather than focusing on her disability. She created a new routine, a new sense of purpose and became a stronger role model for her daughter.

To everything, there is a season. If you are on SSDI or non-retirement SSI, you, too, can change your season from not working to working and find a new sense of satisfaction and a new source of income. The Ticket to Work program is a free and voluntary option to help you get there.

Source: http://usodep.blogs.govdelivery.com/2014/06/11/the-seasons-of-life-with-a-disability/


updated by @employment-network: 11/22/15 01:19:41AM
Employment Network
@employment-network
06/10/14 10:08:16AM
17 posts

Article/Blog: WHAT PEOPLE DON'T UNDERSTAND ABOUT HIRING SOMEONE WITH A PHYSICAL DISABILITY


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An interesting piece written by Justin Farley. He brings up several points about what employers gain when hiring someone with a disability. What are your thoughts? Do you agree? Can you think of more benefits for the employer?

WHAT PEOPLE DON'T UNDERSTAND ABOUT HIRING SOMEONE WITH A PHYSICAL DISABILITY

HIRING SOMEONE WITH A PHYSICAL DISABILITY ISN'T AN ACT OF CHARITY; IT'S A DECISION THAT WILL BRING A VALUABLE PERSPECTIVE TO YOUR BUSINESS. HERE'S WHY AND HOW YOU SHOULD WELCOME YOUR NEWEST HIRE.

BY JUSTIN FARLEY

WHAT PEOPLE DON'T UNDERSTAND ABOUT HIRING SOMEONE WITH A PHYSICAL DISABILITY

HIRING SOMEONE WITH A PHYSICAL DISABILITY ISN'T AN ACT OF CHARITY; IT'S A DECISION THAT WILL BRING A VALUABLE PERSPECTIVE TO YOUR BUSINESS. HERE'S WHY AND HOW YOU SHOULD WELCOME YOUR NEWEST HIRE.

Seems a little rude, doesnt it? Believe it or not, this happens to me frequently when I go to a restaurant.

I was born with Cerebral Palsy, and while I walk differently and speak a little slowly, my cognitive functioning is not impaired in the slightest. Cerebral Palsy does cause shakiness, particularly in my right side, it impacts my speech, and walking in large crowds of people can be a bit treacherous due to the unsteadiness in my right leg. Certainly, I have my limits, but I can find a solution or alternative way to do just about every task in my life.

Perhaps the hardest thing, though, is that living with a disability means also living with the assumptions people make about you: In my case, people usually assume a physical disability automatically equates to severe cognitive disability.

For this reason, ever since I was very young, I have always wanted to work for myself, knowing that the most accommodating employer I could ever have would be me. I knew that living with a physical disability and finding a job would prove to be difficult, as it is for any new college grad, but I also know that the unemployment rate for people with a disability is double or triple the rate for those without.

PERHAPS THE HARDEST THING IS THAT LIVING WITH A DISABILITY MEANS ALSO LIVING WITH THE ASSUMPTIONS PEOPLE MAKE ABOUT YOU.

REEXAMINING THE ISSUE FROM THE OTHER SIDE OF THE COIN.

Having started my own company, I need to hire employees, and I want to make sure I am as accommodating for others as I am for myself. If I hadnt pursued my personal dream of starting my own business, I know there are certain things that I would have been passionate about finding in an employer.

For those organizations hiring an employee living with a physical disability, it is important to understand, from the beginning, that the candidate is not defined by his or her disability, and should be treated as their own person.

There are certain things to look for in a company when living with a physical disability, and there are definitely characteristics to consider in an employee that has a physical disability. For the most part, though, it is as much about fit as with any job candidate.

To accommodate an employee living with a physical disability, it is crucial to understand the candidates capabilities and to recognize what accommodations, if any, may be needed. Dont be afraid to ask, as not every person living with a disability faces the same challenges or has the same needs. There are a wide variety of products that make things like typing, for example, easier and more efficient for someone living with a physical disability.

Apart from mandated ADA standards, adapting your office with wheelchair-friendly desks and supplying employees with inexpensive adaptive office tools like specialty scissors and writing utensils, typing aids, magnifiers, and talking calculators are simple solutions that can make everyday tasks much more efficient for your employee.

When considering a job candidate that is living with a physical disability, remember that you are also hiring a huge asset to the company. Typing speed matters when you are looking for a typist or filling a data input position, but if the skill set calls for some creativity, he or she can often offer an entirely new perspective on the things that able-bodied employees may take for granted.

PEOPLE LIVING WITH A DISABILITY ARE EXPERTS AT OVERCOMING OBSTACLES, AND IT WILL SHOW IN THEIR DEDICATION TO THEIR WORK.

This perspective and long practiced ability to adapt to everyday tasks can inspire new ideas and prove that there is a solution or alternative for most situations, if you think about it in a different way. It is also important to recognize that every employee you have, able bodied or not, excels in some areas and lacks in others, and it is the areas in which they can excel that really matter.

WELCOMING YOUR NEWEST HIRE

Hiring an employee living with a physical disability is not fulfilling some kind of quota or checking off a box to showcase company diversity. People living with a disability are experts at overcoming obstacles, and it will show in their dedication to their work.

When you do hire someone living with a disability, then it must be into an inclusive, welcoming environment. Existing employees are usually completely accommodating if they have the opportunity to understand the type of disability the candidate is living with and the appropriate ways to interact. Both the candidate and the company need to be prepared to discuss these issues openly.

In my case, I may just need assistance with tasks involving fine motor skills; there is no need to speak to me more loudly or slowly, but I realize some people wont know this automatically. There are professionals to help with these kinds of transitions, if needed, and their help can make the experience much more comfortable for everyone, as ultimately, your new employee will not want to be treated differently based on his or her disability.

There are certainly a lot of things to consider when hiring someone living with a physical disability, but both parties can plan in advance to make the transition easy. The possibilities are truly endless, and I hope sharing these tips has inspired someone living with a disability to go for that dream job, or a company to take the leap and give that candidate a chance, despite the fear of what the unknown may bring.

Personally, I am looking forward to finding some great employees!

--Justin Farleyis the founder ofUNlimiters, a website community and mainstream marketplace created by those living with disabilities for those living with disabilities, with the ultimate goal of helping its customers live an unlimited life.

Source:http://www.fastcompany.com/3031327/why-hiring-someone-with-a-physical-disability-is-one-of-the-best-decision-you-could-make


updated by @employment-network: 11/21/15 04:14:33PM
Employment Network
@employment-network
06/09/14 01:32:44PM
17 posts

Rehab Management: May Report Indicates Americans with Disabilities Continue to Experience Disparity Job Growth


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An article from Rehab Management (www.rehabpub.com) about how the May jobs report indicates a decrease in employment for people with disabilities. Why do you think this is?

May Report Indicates Americans with Disabilities Continue to Experience Disparity in Job Growth

According to todays National Trends in Disability EmploymentMonthly Update (nTIDE), the May jobs report indicates that Americans with disabilities continue to experience disparity in the economys job growth.Kessler Foundationand the University of New HampshiresInstitute on Disability(UNH-IOD) issue the nTIDE. A Kessler Foundation news release adds that efforts are underway in an effort to support employment opportunities for job seekers with disabilities.

TheBureau of Labor Statistics Jobs Report, released June 6, suggests that the employment-to-population ratio decreased from 27.2% in May 2013 to 25.8% in May 2014 for working-age individuals with disabilities. For those without disabilities, the employment-to-population ratio increased from 70.8% in May 2013 to 71.7% in May 2014. The release notes that the employment-to-population ratio reflects the percentage of individuals who are working relative to the total population.

Mays jobs data reports that the percentage of individuals with disabilities looking for work decreased, reducing from 4.9% in May 2013 to 4.2% in May 2014. According to the release, this percentage stems from the number of job seekers divided by the number of individuals in the total population multiplied by 100. For individuals without disabilities, the percentage looking for work also declined from 5.4% in May 2013 to 4.5% in May 2014.

John ONeill, PhD, Kessler Foundation director of Employment and Disability Research, states in the release that while the report shows mixed results for the overall economy, individuals with disabilities continue to be left out of the recovery.

More action needs to be taken to expand employment opportunities for this talented population as they continue the frustrating search for a job, ONeill adds.

Andrew Houtenville, PhD, UNH-IOD, associate professor of Economics, notes that, For the past 2 months, fewer people with disabilities are looking for work when compared to last years corresponding months. Coupled with a slide in the employment-to-population ratio, the employment environment for people with disabilities remains dim while they strive to find work or maintain employment

The release reports that in spite of this dreary outlook, non-profits and businesses are working to support efforts to create or expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including veterans. Veteran Staffing Network (VSN), a social enterprise employment agency for veterans with and without disabilities, is among these organizations working with job seekers with disabilities to identify job skills and interests, matching them with the needs of employers.

Rodger DeRose, president, CEO, Kessler Foundation, adds in the release that the foundation awarded nearly half a million dollars to VSN in order to expand the organizations reach and serve more individuals.

The release states that in May 2014, among workers aged 16 to 64 years old, 3,976,000 workers with disabilities represented 2.9% of the total 138,353,000 workers in the US.

The next nTIDE is set to be issued July 3.

Source: Kessler Foundation

Source: http://www.rehabpub.com/2014/06/may-report-indicates-americans-disabilities-continue-experience-disparity-job-growth/


updated by @employment-network: 11/22/15 07:50:33AM
Employment Network
@employment-network
01/28/13 02:34:31PM
17 posts

Something New at the Employment Network


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It's the beginning of the year, which is a great time for New Year's resolutions. Here on the Employment Network, we've been scheming about how to make the Network as usable as possible for all our members. We want to make it easy, fun, interesting & valuable for you to participate in this community.

So watch for new changes as they develop here at the Network and share your thoughts in this forum about the changes we're trying out.

We also want to hear about other ideas you have for the Network - What information or activities would be valuable for you? What is easy or difficult for you to use on the Network? How can we continue to think about growing and developing this community? How can we work together to promote employment for people with disabilities in our local communities? Also share yr thoughts about the changes we're trying out.

If you'd like to connect directly to the Network managers, feel free to send a message toDeb Wisniewski.


updated by @employment-network: 11/22/15 12:04:24PM
Employment Network
@employment-network
04/20/10 11:59:12AM
17 posts

Wisconsin Peer Specialist Employment Initiative


Resources

This link will take you to the Wisconsin Peer Specialist Employment Initiative website:http://www.wicps.org/

Wisconsin Certified Peer Specialists (CPS) are persons whohave not only lived the experience of mental illness but also have had formaltraining in the peer specialist model of mental health supports. They usetheir unique set of recovery experiences in combination with solid skillstraining to support peers who have mental illness. Peer Specialistsactively incorporate peer support into their work while working within anagencies team support structure as a defined part of the recovery team.



updated by @employment-network: 11/07/17 02:06:54PM
 
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